This page was last updated Thu 24 May 2018.

Contents: Tours (71)    Sites (5)    Cycling info pages (3)   

Pages: Previous   1-40   41-79  

Hungary (all)

This page lists all reports that for Hungary including those that involve other countries too.
Click here for a list of reports that involve only Hungary.
All descriptions are in English, unless otherwise noted.

Tours (continued)

Through Eastern Europe, summer 2006
by Blanche, tour started July 2006, submitted 28 January 2007

Through Eastern Europe, summer 2006

Summer 2006 we cycled Eastern Europe. We started in Bucharest Romania and went all the way to the Ukraine border into Hungary, Slovakia, Chzechoslovakia into Germany. On my windows webspace the route and the pictures tell the story. Enjoy!

See all 14 reports by Blanche

Ljubljana to Budapest 2006
by Nick Taylor, tour started September 2006, submitted 4 October 2006
Europe: Slovenia, Hungary

A self-organised, seven-day tour for four through the countryside of Eastern Slovenia and Western Hungary. A total of 647km travelled.

Highlights included: romantic Ljubljana, the socialist-realist new town of Velenje, traversing the Pohorje Massif via the Rogla ski resort, crossing the border at Kobilje, sampling erratic Hungarian driving techniques, having to off-road frequently, 85km of flat along Lake Balaton, the old town of Szekesfehervar (when we found it), and entering Budapest the hard way via the Buda hills.

All that and sampling every beer we could find...

See all 7 reports by Nick Taylor

Hungarian roads sometimes disappear!
The Totally Knackered Tour - Across Europe and Central Asia
by Tim and Rowena Barnes, tour started March 2006, submitted 26 September 2006

In March of 2006 we set out to cycle from the UK to Tibet. We didn't quite make it but had a great adventure cycling across Europe in one of the wettest winters on record and then through the wilds of Central Asia. The site includes lots of images from Tajikistan one of the really countries for cycling.

Summit of the Khaburabot Pass Tajikistan
Vienna to Istanbul (1800km in 10.5 days)
by Simon, tour started May 2004, submitted 1 May 2006

I can't really remember how we came up with the idea. It wasn't like, 'Hey, let's cycle from Europe to Asia.' It was an accumulation of small and different snippets of information via the Internet, certain other events and I suppose fate, that all slowly came together to give us our planned destination 'ISTANBUL'.

One thing was definite, the good old faithful Blue Danube River played it's usual important role in the idea, which was to safely guide us, not all of the way, but at least a part of it.

See all 4 reports by Simon

Tour Vienna-Istanbul = Green  Tour Donaueschingen-Vienna = Red
Von Wien nach Istanbul Deutsche Fassung, 1760km in 10,5 Tage durch 6 Länder
by Simon, tour started May 2004, submitted 1 May 2006
language: de

Ich kann mich nicht genau erinnern wie wir auf diese Idee gekommen sind. Wir haben nicht einfach gesagt ``warum radeln wir nicht von Europa nach Asien?''. Es war eher eine Ansammlung kleiner und unterschiedlicher Informationen aus dem Internet, verbunden mit anderen Ereignissen und wahrscheinlich auch Schicksal, was uns letztendlich unser Ziel Istanbul gegeben hat.

Eines war sicher, unsere altvertraute Blaue Donau spielte wie immer eine wichtige Rolle. Sie zeigte uns den Weg, und begleitete uns treu fast bis ans Ziel.

See all 4 reports by Simon

Hier bin ich und tu das was ich am besten kann. Auf meinen Arsch sitzen ;))
cycling the Danube and Elbe cycle ways (2004 and 2005)
by Jack Dann, tour started May 2005, submitted 10 March 2006

Cycling the Elbe and Danube cycle ways.

Two tours, one of the Danube cycle way from Germany to Budapest, then through Slovenia to Venice, and the Elbe cycle tour from Hook of Holland to Prague via Hamburg; passing through Germany and Dresden.

16,500 miles and thirteen months cycling from the United Kingdom to Beijing
by Christopher J.A. Smith, tour started May 2000, submitted 22 February 2006

This website accompanies the book ``Why Don't You Fly?'' (ISBN 1-905203-25-X published by Pen Press).

How does it feel to trade comfort and security for life as a nomad and to pare one's life down to the bare necessities? What is it like to push at the frontiers of one's physical and mental endurance?

``Why Don't You Fly?'' is the account of an epic adventure in search of an elusive sense of identity in which triumph, disappointment, discomfort, exhaustion and exhilaration all trade positions against a backdrop of prodigious physical endeavour. During a gruelling 16,500-mile examination of physical and mental stamina the author ate and drank in roadside cafés in the company of inquisitive lorry drivers and shared dormitories in remote Chinese villages with fascinated farm hands and gleeful mosquitoes. Sceptical western existentialism met religious fatalism in the restaurants and teahouses of the Middle East and India in the course of a physical and spiritual journey that constantly raised questions about the attitudes and values that prevail in the West.

The Website includes a chapter-by-chapter synopsis of the book, a sample chapter and 93 photographs.

Bicycle Travelling in 24 Countries
by Peter Davis, tour started June 2005, submitted 4 February 2006

This webpage is intended to provide information for cycle tourists who may be considering tours in the countries I've visited. For more information, journals and pictures leave a message in my guestbook or send me an email.

`` Yes, it's hot. But we've seen worse haven't we my friend. There was that day east of Warnambol when the chip seal melted and the chips stuck to the tires. A few revolutions later we had flats front and rear. So we pushed for a mile seeking shade to repair the punctures. And the flies Ah! And there was that time in Zamorah. Ah! But not now.''

See all 2 reports by Peter Davis

Bicycle tour at Ukraine (Carpathian area), Zsurk - Ushgorod - Turia Valley
by Medveczky György, tour started May 2005, submitted 13 January 2006
Europe: Ukraine, Hungary
language: hu, en

See all 5 reports by Medveczky György

At the Budapest - Kiev Highway
The Great Heart Travelers
by Julien Leblay, tour started 2004, submitted 28 November 2005
language: en, fr

``The Great Heart Travelers'' promote the blood donation riding around the world. They made a Europe tour of 5400 km in 2004, and a tour in New Zealand in 2005. (Follow the archive link at the bottom of the page to go to the European tour.)

See all 2 reports by Julien Leblay

Five continents on the bike 2001-2006
by rolmaatjes, tour started August 2001, submitted 8 October 2005
language: nl

In 2001 vanuit Nederland vertrokken en nu okt 2005 meer dan 65.000 km en al meer dan 40 landen doorgefietst.

Op de achtergrond het beroemde operagebouw in Sydney
Bicycle tour Carpathian & Balkan mountains
by Minko Oh, tour started June 2003

I did a tour along the Moldavian painted monasteries [in Romania], starting with a not too difficult pass. Sucevita monastery was even more beautiful. From there I continued east to a bigger town, Radauti, to find a bank machine for a few millions of cash. Via Solca I reached Gura Humorului. Met a group of German cycle tourists. Near the Sucevita monastery I found a nice place to camp at a B&B farm. I insisted to pay for this and for the use of the sanitary facilities and the host accepted my offer of 5 euros, which is a crazy amount for a simple camping spot. For this amount he invited me to sleep in a bedroom inside, but I refused politely and opted for my tent with nice views on the village road. My host spoke good English, teaching American sailors in Brasov and staying at his parents farm during the holiday season. [The next day I took] a small detour to visit the Voronet monastery.

See all 8 reports by Minko Oh

Red rocks of Belogradchik in Bulgaria
Bicycle tour Carpathian and Balkan mountains
by Minko Oh, tour started June 2003

[On June 20 2003] I did a tour along the Moldavian painted monasteries [in Romania], starting with a not too difficult pass. Sucevita monastery was even more beautiful. From there I continued east to a bigger town, Radauti, to find a bank machine for a few millions of cash. Via Solca I reached Gura Humorului. Met a group of German cycle tourists. Near the Sucevita monastery I found a nice place to camp at a B&B farm. I insisted to pay for this and for the use of the sanitary facilities and the host accepted my offer of 5 euros, which is a crazy amount for a simple camping spot. For this amount he invited me to sleep in a bedroom inside, but I refused politely and opted for my tent with nice views on the village road. My host spoke good English, teaching American sailors in Brasov and staying at his parents farm during the holiday season. [The next day I took] a small detour to visit the Voronet monastery.

See all 8 reports by Minko Oh

Red rocks of Belogradchik in Bulgaria
Nederland Azie op die fiets
by Jurgen en Saskia, tour started September 2001
language: nl

Ja, hebben jullie het al gezien, we zijn meer dan 4 jaar onderweg. Wat een tijd en toch.... we genieten er nog elke dag van. Nu zijn we in Jujuy, noord Argentinië. Via Chili gaan we binnenkort naar Bolivia, waar we een tijdlang niet zullen kunnen internetten. We zullen op grote hoogte gaan fietsen, hoogtes waar we nog niet eerder waren. Of dat prettig is.. jullie zullen het later lezen.

Bucarest - Cracovia
by Stefano Lugli, tour started July 2001
language: it

Le strade sono in buone condizioni in Polonia, Slovacchia e Ungheria. Per quanto riguarda la Romania la situazione varia dall'importanza della strada che si sta percorrendo. Quelle indicate nella mappa del Touring col colore bianco sotto la dicitura di ``altra strade'' sono spesso con un fondo stradale dissestato con buche o rattoppi che rendono la strada molto irregolare. Tutto questo in un ottica automobilistica, ma in un contesto cicloturistico ciò non comporta grossi problemi. Unica avvertenza non andare sparati in discesa se volete evitare spiacevoli imprevisti.

Notevole è però l'impegno rumeno per migliorare lo stato delle cose; strada facendo abbiamo incontrato spesso lavori stradali di risistemazione o rifacimento del manto stradale, quindi la situazione è possibile che migliori di anno in anno. Il traffico è abbondante a Bucarest e in direzione nord fino a Brasov; la statale 1 o E60 che parte da Bucarest fino a Ploiesti è vietata al traffico ciclistico. Conviene evitare, come del resto abbiamo fatto salvo poche eccezioni, le strade rosse di grande comunicazione. Ricordatevi che in Romania non esistono praticamente autostrade, quindi tutto il traffico si scarica sulle statali. Posso aggiungere che nelle strade alternative scelte, percorse e qui descritte abbiamo trovato quasi sempre un traffico scarso o tollerabile. La viabilità alle biciclette è consentita su quasi tutte le strade percorse. Abbiamo trovato qualche limitazione in Ungheria, apparentemente immotivata, che abbiamo risolto o con percorsi alternativi o, in un solo caso, infischiandocene del divieto.

La pedalata è adatta ad un cicloturista allenato. La lunga distanza e i dislivelli da percorrere non devono fare però paura. Il paesaggio carpatico è simile all'appennino tosco-emiliano, montagne quasi mai aspre, passi intorno ai 1.000 - 1.500 s.l.m.; ma anche dolci colline e pianure.

See all 10 reports by Stefano Lugli

Wien - Budapest in bicicletta
by Andrea Tonegato, tour started May 2000
Europe: Austria, Hungary
language: it

A short tabular tour description.

See all 3 reports by Andrea Tonegato

Warsawa - Budapest - Venezia
by Louis Tousignant, tour started September 1999

My name is Louis Tousignant, a Canadian in his mid fifties, living in Nova Scotia on the Atlantic shore. Having cycled Copenhagen to Rome in 1998, and the U.K. in the mid 80's, it seemed a good idea to try Eastern Europe. As an eager amateur photographer, I particularly wanted to see Krakow, Prague and Budapest. Having had a grand time in Italy the year before, I also wanted to see Venice, a must... before one dies... Ergo this trip which I enjoyed tremendously.

This 52 day trip included 33 days of touring (3003 km for a 91 km/day average) and 19 days of travel and tourism. The load, minus water, was 20 kg, distributed in 4 saddle bags and one camera bag on the rear rack.

See all 4 reports by Louis Tousignant

Crossing the Carpathians by bike
by Györgyi Gábor, tour started July 1999

After four Tatra-tour I knew that I wouldn?t be satisfied with visiting only Zakopane; our goal was to cycle to Krakkow and than back to Hungary. I didn?t know that a guy from the team punctured, so when I cycled back, I found nobody. I had to continue my tour alone, but I hoped we would meet until the evening. In Zdiar during eating I was just thinking that I would have to get used to cycling alone, when my teammates apperared on the road. At the wooden house in the forest at the top of the first climb of Poland we turned not left as in 1997 or 1995, but turned right to north, to the Glodowka meadow. In my fifth Tatra-tour, with about 7-8 years of experiences in cycling I could discuss with the guys that if they don?t join me I could visit the famous wooden church of Debno 15 kms from there.

See all 26 reports by Györgyi Gábor

On the road
tallabomba's Europe to Asia by Bike
by Tom ``tallabomba'' Hermansson Snickars, tour started 1998

In the fall of 1998 I set off on a long journey by bike. It covered more than 15000 kilometers and 14 countries. During this trip I was hit by rocks and cars, I was baked, soaked, and deep frozen by the weather gods. Mostly, however, I had a superb opportunity to see some of the most beautiful scenery in the world, meet wonderful people and enjoy the culture of widely differing lands. This site is about my bike trip from Sweden to South-East Asia via Eastern Europe, The Middle East, Pakistan, China, and Tibet. It also contains general information and links on bicycle touring and travelling in general.

Europe by bike II: Budapest to Gibraltar
by Glenn and Sheila Ord, tour started 1998

Theft Incidents:

  • Muesli and milk (fox suspected); Germany
  • Dog chewing Glenn's dinner plate; France
  • Cat burgler..feline attempt at food in tent vestibule; Spain

See all 5 reports by Glenn and Sheila Ord

Ord's Bike Guide to Europe
by Glenn and Sheila Ord, tour started 1998

From Glenn and Sheila Ord's Home Page: On the Road to Nowhere - Nowhere is the Place. With an emphasis on budget travelling - Our experiences and advice for cycling in Europe. This guide is entirely based on our 7 1/2 months (12,000 km) in 1998 across (and back) Europe: staying almost entirely in campgrounds (185 tent nights). This was supplemented by our time in Italy (April-May 1999).

See all 5 reports by Glenn and Sheila Ord

Europe by bike: London to Budapest
by Glenn and Sheila Ord, tour started 1998

Travel Notes:

  • Thumbs up to: French friendliness, secondary road system, campsites, the bread, wine cheese, pate, supermarkets.
  • Thumbs down to: the April weather, birds that chirp all night long.
  • Most bizarre sight: we spotted 3 English train spotters on holiday watching the trains go by.
  • The gift for the person who has everything: a waterproof baguette holder

See all 5 reports by Glenn and Sheila Ord

A Balkan Tour from Bayreuth to Split and Rijeka
by Dieter Kleiner, tour started August 1997

A five weeks, 2700km tour in August/September 1997, from Germany to Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Slovenia and Croatia. I enjoyed this unforgettable trip thoroughly. Scenery, people, food etc. changed continuously.

Eastern Europe
by Thomas Driemeyer, tour started July 1997

The border to Slovenia is just a few km behind Gorizia. They still actually have border guards there even though Slovenia has recently become an EU member, but they just wave everybody through. Route 444 follows the freeway but is very quiet and pleasant, far more than the roads in Italy that led us here. At Ajdovscina we took route 207 and 621, which turned out to be more hilly than we thought - we gained 750 meters in one long and relentless climb, with little shadow. Very scenic though, with many views of the valleys. Near Podkraj a windy but exhilarating descent began, and after Logatec the second half of the descent was perfect, with safe long curves and no traffic. The last few km to Lubljana were busy though, as usual when entering a large city.

I used to have this mental image of Slovenia as one of those Socialist paradises, with gray people living in gray cities and trees growing in the potholes. Quite the opposite! Friendly clean cities, very good roads, and on a warm Saturday evening like this one the streets and cafes are bursting with people enjoying themselves. This country has definitely arrived in the 21st century. Ljubljana has a very pleasant old town, although much of the rest isn't very pretty.

See all 20 reports by Thomas Driemeyer

Danube bike path
Fietsreis van Rotterdam naar Kaapstad / Bicycle Trip from Rotterdam to Capetown
by Edward van den Heuvel and Barbera van Gerrevink, tour started July 1995
language: nl

Tussen juli 1995 en december 1996 hebben wij een fietsreis gemaakt van Rotterdam naar Kaapstad. Op deze reis hebben we door twintig landen gefietst in Europa, het Midden Oosten en Afrika. In anderhalf jaar tijd hebben we een afstand van ruim 20.000 kilometer afgelegd. Op deze internet-site kun je enkele verhalen over deze reis lezen en de mooiste van onze honderden foto's bekijken.

Fahrrad-Thermal-Urlaub in Ungarn
by Ralph Sontag, tour started August 1993
language: de

Kosice, Roznava, Miskolc, Eger, Tiszafüred, Hajdoszoboszlo, Szarvas, Csongrad, Kiskunhalas, Villany, Haromfa, Zalakaros, Heviz, Sarvar, Kapuvar, Breitenbrunn, Bratislava.

See all 3 reports by Ralph Sontag

Cycling Central Europe
by Eric McCaughrin, tour started 1993

This is the Pilsner tour, covering Germany, Hungary, Austria, and the Czech Republic. The terrain is rolling hills and the routes traverse famous rivers and the towns and cities that formed along their banks.

See all 5 reports by Eric McCaughrin

Beer, what else?
A tour of Hungary
by Franco Comai, tour started 1993
Europe: Hungary, Austria
language: en, it

See all 2 reports by Franco Comai

Cycling Central Europe
by Eric McCaughrin

This is the Pilsner tour, covering Germany, Hungary, Austria, and the Czech Republic. The terrain is rolling hills and the routes traverse famous rivers and the towns and cities that formed along their banks.

See all 5 reports by Eric McCaughrin

Archivio salite d'Europa/European climbs
by Voronin
language: it, de, fr, en

Tabular data and altitude profiles of mountain passes all over Europe.

Biketour-tips: Pilis, Mátra
by Györgyi Gábor
Europe: Hungary

In the last few years the popularity of cycling has increased in Hungary, so more and more people are choosing biking to spend their spare time. With the growing popularity of cycling the local governments can only limitedly satisfy the claims of bike road-building. Although the length of cycle-roads increase a little from year to year. These roads are sometimes real roads, not the edge of tracks or parts of pavements, but in other cases they are separated with a line from the tracks or pavements.

Pilis is ideally situated for either cyclists to see Budapest or the bikers who are curious about Esztergom (church!!) and the Danube bend. We can find here roads with good quality, but the asphalted forest roads (without any traffic) are also good. The ascents [...] are generally 4-8% steep.

Mátra is the highest mountain-range (on a small area) of Hungary, its top Kékesteõ is 1015m above sea level. With the normal and forest roads, the Matra is in any case a favourable mountain-range for those who search after roads in forests, and who like the ascents. Eger, Parádfürdõ, Szilvásvárad, and the castle of Sirok are things that are worth seeing or cycling there for. At the south foot of the Matra are grown grapes.

See all 26 reports by Györgyi Gábor

A (pale) view of Budapest

Sites

Fahrrad Reisen / Bicycle Touring
by camino10, , submitted 13 June 2010
language: de, en

Travelogues, trip reports and travel photography: Crossing the Rocky Mountains in Canada and the Sierra Madre Mountain Range in Mexico, along the Mediterranean coast of Italy, France and Spain, bike tour to ancient Greece and Turkey, Island hopping in Mallorca, Corsica and Crete, Trans Alps Bike Tour

Reiseberichte und Tourenberichte von Fahrrad Reisen durch die Rocky Mountains in Kanada und die Sierra Madre in Mexiko, entlang der Mittelmeer Küste von Italien, Frankreich und Spanien, Veloreise bis Griechenland und die Türkei, klassischer Donau-Radweg und Elbe-Radweg, Radtouren auf den Inseln Mallorca, Korsika und Kreta, Trans Alps Bike Tour.

See all 10 reports by camino10

Danube River Bike Tour
Reiseberichte Wittram Braunschweig
by Martin Wittram
language: de, en

A large list of cycle tours, 30 at the last count. Most are in Germany, but others go all over central and northern Europe. See the overview page. English translations are available for all pages.

See all 27 reports by Martin Wittram

Zwei Räder für's Leben (Stord, Norwegen)
Fahrrad-Reiseberichte
by Dietmar Jaeger
language: de

An enormous collection of bicycle tours all over the world.
Eine enorme Sammlung von Fahrradtouren in der ganzen Welt.

Kormanyblog
by Medveczky György
Europe: Hungary
language: hu

Contains a lot of pictures in connection with our cycling and hiking activities.

See all 5 reports by Medveczky György

Reiseberichte
by Karl Brodowsky
language: de

A massive travel site, this guy has been everywhere.

Hier finden sich einige deutschsprachige Reiseberichte von Fahrradtouren, die hoffentlich unterhaltsam und informativ sind, aber auch vielleicht die eine oder andere Anregung für Leute geben, die selber einmal so etwas machen wollen. Für englischsprachige Radtourenberichte habe ich hier auch einen Anfang gemacht, ebenso für schwedischsprachige Radtourenberichte, wobei noch ein bißchen auf norwegisch und dänisch dabei ist, aber diese drei skaninavischen Sprachen sind so ähnlich, daß man entweder alle drei ein bißchen lesen kann oder eben keine davon.

See all 16 reports by Karl Brodowsky

Cycling info pages

Bicycles - World's Most Efficient Means of Transport
by Hostelio, , submitted 2 September 2009

Man on a bicycle can go three or four times faster than the pedestrian, but uses five times less energy in the process. He carries one gram of his weight over a kilometer of flat road at an expense of only 0.15 calories. The bicycle is the perfect transducer to match man's metabolic energy to the impedance of locomotion. Equipped with this tool, man outstrips the efficiency of not only all machines but all other animals as well. [...]

Bicycles are not only thermodynamically efficient, they are also cheap. With his much lower salary, the Chinese acquires his durable bicycle in a fraction of the working hours an American devotes to the purchase of his obsolescent car. The cost of public utilities needed to facilitate bicycle traffic versus the price of an infrastructure tailored to high speeds is proportionately even less than the price differential of the vehicles used in the two systems. In the bicycle system, engineered roads are necessary only at certain points of dense traffic, and people who live far from the surfaced path are not thereby automatically isolated as they would be if they depended on cars or trains. The bicycle has extended man's radius without shunting him onto roads he cannot walk. Where he cannot ride his bike, he can usually push it.

The bicycle also uses little space. Eighteen bikes can be parked in the place of one car, thirty of them can move along in the space devoured by a single automobile. It takes three lanes of a given size to move 40,000 people across a bridge in one hour by using automated trains, four to move them on buses, twelve to move them in their cars, and only two lanes for them to pedal across on bicycles. Of all these vehicles, only the bicycle really allows people to go from door to door without walking. The cyclist can reach new destinations of his choice without his tool creating new locations from which he is barred. [...]

The Twizi hostel directory - the cheapest places to stay on the planet
by Patrick Sexton, , submitted 6 January 2007

[The author travels around the world and reviews hostels, and has built up a large hostel directory.]

What are hostels?

The quickest answer I can give to you is that hostels are budget accommodations where you share a room with other travelers. To be more specific though and to give you a better idea of what to expect I will say that a hostel room is like a hotel room but instead of being just one bed there are a couple (or a few) bunk beds. There are also (gasp!) other people. People you do not know! These other people are travelers who are most likely very much like you in the sense that they are exploring and traveling and doing it as absolutely cheaply as possible. Hostels have been around a long long time. There are over 20,000 of them around the world. Hostels are very much a part of the culture of Europe, and are starting to be known in the USA as well. Hostels are a cheaper way of staying in a city where you do not live.

world map
Rec.Travel Library: Hungary
Europe: Hungary

Pages: Previous   1-40   41-79